History of Medicine

Elizabeth Armstrong

Elizabeth M. Armstrong has research interests in public health, the history and sociology of medicine, social determinants of health, and medical ethics. She is the author of Conceiving Risk, Bearing Responsibility: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and the Diagnosis of Moral Disorder (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003) and articles on family planning, medical mistakes, adolescent motherhood, and the sociology of pregnancy and birth. Her current research includes a longitudinal study of agenda setting around disease in the U.S. and a study of fetal personhood and obstetrical ethics.

Laura Hirshbein

Laura Hirshbein completed her MD and psychiatry residency at the University of Michigan, and also completed a PhD in the history of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University. Her first book, American Melancholy: Constructions of Depression in the Twentieth Century was published by Rutgers University Press in 2009. Her second book, Smoking Privileges: Psychiatry, the Mentally Ill, and the Tobacco Industry in America was published January 2015 with Rutgers University Press. She is currently on faculty in psychiatry as Professor at the University of Michigan.

Carla Keirns

Carla C. Keirns is Assistant Professor of Medical Ethics at the University of Kansas Medical Center. Previously, she acted as Assistant Professor of preventive medicine, medicine and history at Stony Brook University. She received her undergraduate education at Cornell University, her medical degree (2003) and doctorate in History & Sociology of Science from the University of Pennsylvania (2004).

Barron Lerner

Barron H. Lerner is the Angelica Berrie-Gold Foundation Associate Professor of Medicine and Public Health at the Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons. Dr. Lerner received his M.D. from Columbia in 1986 and his Ph.D. in history from the University of Washington in 1996. His latest book, When Illness Goes Public: Celebrity Patients and How We Look at Medicine, was published October 2006 by the Johns Hopkins University Press.

Margaret Marsh

Margaret Marsh, Distinguished Professor of History and University Professor at Rutgers University, served for thirteen years, beginning in 1998, in senior leadership positions at Rutgers, including Dean and Executive Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Interim Chancellor, both on the Camden campus. She now divides her time between Arts and Sciences in Camden and the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research in New Brunswick.

Wanda Ronner

Wanda Ronner MD is a Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Ronner is a general gynecologist and the Medical Student Coordinator and Associate Residency Director in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Pennsylvania Hospital. She graduated from Temple University School of Medicine and completed her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Rochester. Dr.

Sheila Rothman

Sheila M. Rothman is a professor of public health at the Mailman School of Public Health and Deputy Director of the Center for the Study of Society and Medicine at Columbia University. Trained in social history, her research has explored American attitudes and policies toward women, persons with mental disabilities, those with chronic diseases, and those at risk for genetic disease.

David Rothman

David J. Rothman is Bernard Schoenberg Professor of Social Medicine and Director of the Center for Study of Society and Medicine at the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons. He is also president of the Institute on Medicine as a Profession, whose mission is to make professionalism a field and a force. (See www.imapny.org) Trained in american social history at Harvard University, David Rothman first explored the origins of mental hospitals, prisons, and almshouses. His 1971 book, The Discovery of the Asylum, was co-winner of the Albert J.

Nancy Tomes

Nancy J. Tomes is a distinguished professor of history at Stony Brook University. A native of Louisville, Kentucky, she received her undergraduate education at Oberlin College and the University of Kentucky, and her doctorate in American history from the University of Pennsylvania (1978). She is the author of three books, two on the history of American mental hospitals, and most recently, The Gospel of Germs: Men, Women and the Microbe in American Life (1998), which won multiple book prizes.

Keith Wailoo

Keith A. Wailoo is the Townsend Martin Professor of History and Public Affairs and is jointly appointed to Princeton University's Department of History and Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He is the former vice dean of the Woodrow Wilson School. Previously, he served on the faculty at Rutgers for nine years and was named the Martin Luther King, Jr. Professor of History in 2006. Before joining Rutgers, Dr. Wailoo was a member of the faculty of social medicine and history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.