National Advisory Committee

Sheila Burke, M.P.A., R.N., F.A.A.N.
  • Faculty Research Fellow, Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy
  • Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy
  • John F. Kennedy School of Government
  • Harvard University

Sheila P. Burke is adjunct lecturer in public policy at Kennedy School of Government and faculty research fellow at the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy at Harvard University. She served as Executive Dean of the School from 1996-2000. Previously she had been Chief of Staff to former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (1985 to 1996), a professional staff member of the Senate Committee on Finance (1979-1982), and deputy staff director of that committee (1982 to 1985). She is a member of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. She serves on the adjunct faculty at Georgetown University and is a distinguished visitor at the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, Georgetown Law Center. She serves on several boards including the Kaiser Commission on the Future of Medicaid and the Uninsured and the Partnership for Public Service. She served as a member of the Medicaid Payment Advisory Commission from 2000-2007, and the Kaiser Family Foundation from 1999-2008. Burke holds an MPA from the Kennedy School, a BS in nursing from the University of San Francisco, and worked as a staff nurse in Berkeley, California.

Lawrence Casalino, M.D., Ph.D.
  • Livingston Farrand Associate Professor of Public Health
  • Chief, Division of Outcomes and Effectiveness Research
  • Department of Public Health
  • Weill Cornell Medical College

Lawrence Casalino is Chief of the Division of Outcomes and Effectiveness Research and Livingston Farrand Associate Professor of Public Health in the Department of Public Health at Weill Cornell Medical College. His background includes 20 years as a family physician in private practice. He holds a doctoral degree in health services research, with a focus on organizational and institutional sociology and economics. Previously, he was an associate professor with the department of health studies at the University of Chicago.

Dr. Casalino's research focuses on the organization of physician practice, and, in particular, the kinds of organized processes physicians use to improve the quality and control the costs of medical care. He is also exploring questions around the forms of relationships that physicians have with hospitals and health plans; the effects on quality and cost of the varying types of physician practice organization; and the influence of public and private policies on the ways that physician practice is organized. Dr. Casalino is currently studying disease management, outpatient medical errors, physician views on quality measurement and pay for performance, and clinical integration in relation to federal anti-trust regulation.

He has published in a number of journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association, Health Affairs, Health Services Research, Journal of Health and Social Behavior, and JHPPL.

» 1999 Awardee Details

Paul D. Cleary, Ph.D.
  • Anna M.R. Lauder Professor of Public Health and Department Chair
  • Dean of Public Health
  • Department of Epidemiology and Public Health
  • School of Public Health
  • Yale University

Paul D. Cleary is Dean of Public Health, Anna M.R. Lauder Professor of Public Health, and chair of the department of epidemiology and public health at Yale University. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. His research interests include developing better methods for using patient reports about their care and health status to evaluate the quality of medical care and studying the relationships between clinician and organizational characteristics and the quality of medical care. He has published over 250 research articles on these topics.

Dr. Cleary's recent research includes a study of how organizational characteristics affect the costs and quality of care for persons with AIDS, a national evaluation of a continuous quality improvement initiative in clinics providing care to HIV infected individuals, and a statewide effort to improve cancer care in Massachusetts. He also is principal investigator of one of the Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Studies (CAHPS III) funded by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHRQ) to develop survey protocols for collecting information from consumers about their health plans and services and to use that information for quality improvement.

In 1996 Cleary was selected as a distinguished fellow of the Association for Health Services Research and in 2002 received the Distinguished Investigator Award from the Academy for Health Services Research and Health Policy. He is editorial director of the Milbank Memorial Fund and for nine years was editor of the Milbank Quarterly. He is chair of the National Advisory Committee for the RWJF Investigator Awards in Health Policy Research program. He has served as associate editor of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, consulting editor of the Journal of Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry, and has been on the editorial boards of The Handbook of Social Studies in Health and Medicine and the Advanced Handbook of Methods in Evidence Based Health Care. He is on the editorial boards of Health Services Research and the Journal of Health Services Research and Policy. In 1997 Harvard Medical School awarded him the A. Clifford Barger Award for Excellence in Mentoring.

Judy Feder, Ph.D.
  • Professor
  • McCourt School of Public Policy
  • Georgetown University

Judy Feder is professor of the Georgetown Public Policy Institute and from 1999-2008 she served as Dean. She was a nominee for Congress in Virginia's 10th Congressional District in 2006 and 2008. She is one of the nation's leaders in health policy--most particularly, in efforts to understand and improve the nation's health insurance system. A widely published scholar, her three decades of policy research began at the Brookings Institution, continued at the Urban Institute, and, since 1984, has flourished at Georgetown University. Her expertise on the uninsured, Medicare, Medicaid, and long-term care is regularly drawn upon by members of Congress, Executive officials, and the national media.

Feder has also held leadership policy positions, both in the Congress and in the Executive Branch. As staff director of the congressional Pepper Commission (chaired by Senator John D. Rockefeller IV), Feder is widely credited with setting the stage for the health reform debate of the 1990s. In 1993, she was appointed to the Department of Health and Human Services, where she worked to expand health insurance coverage, effectively manage Medicare and Medicaid, and assure the safety of food and drugs.

Feder today pursues her policy leadership first and foremost by educating future policy leaders at Georgetown's Public Policy Institute. She continues her research as co-director (with Sheila Burke) of the Georgetown University Long-term Care Financing Project and as senior advisor to the Kaiser Family Foundation's Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured.

Feder is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Public Administration, and the National Academy of Social Insurance; a former chair and board member of AcademyHealth; a board member of the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy and the Center for American Progress Action Fund Committee. She is also a member of the National Research Council's Standing Committee on Research and Evidentiary Standards, the Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellowships Program Advisory Board, and the Hamilton Project's Advisory Council.

Feder is a political scientist, with a B.A. from Brandeis University (1968) and a Master's (1970) and Ph.D. (1977) from Harvard University.

Sherman James, Ph.D.
  • Research Professor
  • Department of Epidemiology
  • School of Public Health
  • Emory University

Sherman A. James is a research professor in the Emory University School of Public Health. Perviously he was the Susan B. King Distinguished Professor of Public Policy in the Sanford School of Public Policy and professor of sociology and community and family medicine at Duke University. Prior to joining Duke University, he taught in the epidemiology departments at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (1973-89) and at the University of Michigan (1989-03). At Michigan, he was the John P. Kirscht Collegiate Professor of Public Health, the Founding Director (1998-2003) of the Center for Research on Ethnicity, Culture and Health (CRECH), chair (1999-2003) of the department of health behavior and health education, and a senior research scientist in the Survey Research Center at the Institute for Social Research. A social epidemiologist, Dr. James' research focuses on racial and ethnic inequalities in health status, and health care, and community-based and public policy interventions designed to minimize, and ultimately eliminate, these inequalities. Dr. James was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 2000. In 2001, he received the Abraham Lilienfeld Award from the Epidemiology section of the American Public Health Association for career excellence in the teaching of epidemiology. He is a fellow of the American Epidemiological Society, the American College of Epidemiology, the American Heart Association, and the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research. In 2007-2008, he served as president of the Society for Epidemiologic Research (SER). Dr. James has served on numerous NIH Study Sections and editorial boards of scientific journals; the latter include Associate Editorships of Ethnicity and Disease and the American Journal of Public Health. Dr. James received his Ph.D. (Social Psychology) from Washington University in St. Louis (1973). 

Bruce G. Link, Ph.D.
  • Professor
  • Department of Epidemiology
  • Mailman School of Public Health
  • Columbia University

Bruce G. Link is professor of epidemiology and sociomedical sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health of Columbia University and a research scientist at New York State Psychiatric Institute. Dr. Link received his Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University in 1980 and a Master's degree in biostatistics, also from Columbia. Dr. Link's interests are centered on topics in psychiatric and social epidemiology. He has written on the connection between socioeconomic status and health, homelessness, violence, stigma, and discrimination. Currently he is conducting research aimed at understanding health disparities by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status, the consequences of social stigma for people with mental illnesses, and the connection between mental illnesses and violent behaviors. He is the director of the Psychiatric Epidemiology Training Program, director of the Center for Youth Violence Prevention, co-director of the Center for the Study of Social Inequalities and Health, and co-director of the Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholars Program Columbia site. Dr. Link was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 2002. He was the recipeint of the 2007 Leo G. Reeder Award from the American Sociological Association's Medical Sociology Section, which recognizes distinguished scholarly contributions to the field of medical sociology, as well as excellence in teaching, mentoring, and training. Dr. Link received the American Public Health Association's 2007 Rema Lapouse Award for outstanding contributions to the scientific understanding of the epidemiology and control of mental disorders. He is a member of the National Advisory Committee of the RWJF Investigator Awards in Health Policy Research program.

» 1995 Awardee Details

Catherine G. McLaughlin, Ph.D.
  • Senior Fellow
  • Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.

Senior fellow Catherine McLaughlin is a nationally recognized expert in managed care, market competition, and employer and employee benefit choice. Until recently, she was the director of Health Research for Mathematica’s office in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

McLaughlin spearheaded the Economic Research Initiative on the Uninsured (ERIU), a seven-year initiative funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to initiate and disseminate research to spark new policy discussions of health coverage issues. She has directed many large-scale studies involving complex surveys on health care issues as well as evaluations of national programs and is a professor in the department of health management and policy at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.

McLaughlin is an elected member of the National Academy of Social Insurance and the Institute of Medicine, a member of the Council of Health Care Economics and Policy and the Health Research and Educational Trust Board of Trustees, and serves on the editorial board of the journal Health Services Research. She publishes widely in peer-reviewed journals such as the Journal of Health and Social Policy, Health Affairs, Journal of the American Medical Association, and others. She is the author of chapters in Frontiers in Health Policy Research, The Political Economy of Health Care Reforms, and International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences. She has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Dr. McLaughlin is a member of the National Advisory Committee of the RWJF Investigator Awards in Health Policy Research program and is a former co-associate director of both the RWJ Clinical Scholars program and Scholars in Health Policy Research Program sites at the University of Michigan.

David Mechanic, Ph.D.
  • René Dubos University Professor of Behavioral Sciences
  • Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research
  • Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

David Mechanic is the René Dubos University Professor of Behavioral Sciences and former Director of the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. His research and writing deal with social aspects of health and health care.

David Mechanic received his Ph.D. from Stanford and joined the University of Wisconsin faculty in 1960, where he was chair of the department of sociology (1968-1970), the John Bascom Professor of Sociology (1973-1979) and director of the Center for Medical Sociology and Health Services Research (1972-1979). He moved to Rutgers University in 1979, was dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (1980-1984), directed the NIMH Center at Rutgers for Research on the Organization and Financing of Care for the Severely Mentally Ill (1988-2004) and established the Rutgers Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research (1985) which he directs. He served as the Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Awards in Health Policy Research program (2000-2012).

Dr. Mechanic is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Institute of Medicine. He has served on numerous panels of the National Academy of Sciences, federal agencies and non-profit organizations.

David Mechanic has received many awards including the Institute of Medicine's 2009 Rhoda and Bernard Sarnat International Prize in Mental Health and 2008 Adam Yarmolinsky Award, the Health Services Research Prize from the Association of University Programs in Health Administration and the Baxter Allegiance Foundation, the Distinguished Investigator Award from the Association for Health Services Research, the Rema Lapouse Award and the First Carl Taube Award for Distinguished Contributions to Mental Health Services Research from the American Public Health Association, and the Distinguished Career Award for the Practice of Sociology, Distinguished Medical Sociologist Award and Lifetime Contributions Award in Mental Health from the American Sociological Association. He also received the Benjamin Rush Award (and Lecture) from the American Psychiatric Association (2004) and was selected for the Inaugural Lecture and Award in the Behavioral and Social Sciences honoring Matilda White Riley at the NIH (2006). He has been a Guggenheim Fellow and fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford.

He has written or edited 30 books and approximately 400 research articles, chapters and other publications in medical sociology, health policy, health services research, and the social and behavioral sciences. Among his books are Mental Health and Social Policy: Beyond Managed Care (5th Edition, 2008); The Truth About Health Care: Why Reform Is Not Working In America (2006); Policy Challenges in Modern Health Care (2005); Inescapable Decisions: The Imperatives of Health Reform (1994); Painful Choices: Research and Essays on Heath Care (1989); From Advocacy to Allocation: The Evolving American Health Care System (1986); and Future Issues in Health Care: Social Policy and the Rationing of Medical Services (1979).

» 1994 Awardee Details

Mark A. Peterson, Ph.D.
  • Professor of Public Policy, Political Science, and Law
  • Department of Public Policy
  • Meyer and Renee Luskin School of Public Affairs
  • University of California, Los Angeles

Mark A. Peterson is Professor of Public Policy, Political Science, and Law at the UCLA Meyer and Renee Luskin School of Public Affairs, where he also chaired the Department of Public Policy and is currently Chair of the Luskin School faculty. He is a faculty affiliated of the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and Institute for Society & Genetics, on the faculty advisory committee for the Center for American Politics and Public Policy, and co-director the Policy Core for the Center for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services. 

He previously held faculty appointments in Government at Harvard University and in International and Public Affairs, Political Science, and Public Health at the University of Pittsburgh. His scholarship on American national institutions includes Legislating Together: The White House and Capitol Hill from Eisenhower to Reagan, Institutions of American Democracy: The Executive Branch (co-edited with Joel Aberbach), and Institutions of American Democracy: A Republic Divided (co-authored). In the domain of health care policy, his contributions include the edited volume, Healthy Markets? The New Competition in Medical Care; with Peter Hammer, Deborah Haas-Wilson, and William Sage, the edited volume Uncertain Times: Kenneth Arrow and the Changing Economics of Health Care; and with Sue Tolleson-Rinehart the four-volume edited series, Health Politics and Policy.  Based on research supported by an RWJF Investigator Award in Health Policy Research, Dr. Peterson is completing a book manuscript entitled, “The Time Was Right for Health Care Reform:  Contexts, Choices, and Consequences.” 

He was Editor of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law from 1993 to 2002, a Guest Scholar at the Brookings Institution, a legislative assistant on health policy for U.S. Senator Tom Daschle, a member of the Study Panel on Medicare and Markets established by the National Academy of Social Insurance, a member of the Health Policy Advisory Committee for the 2008 Obama for President campaign, and is a founding core team member of the Blue Sky Health Initiative. He recently served as the President of the American Political Science Association Public Policy Section and was on the APSA Council, and is a founding member of the Association's Health Politics and Policy Section. He is the recipient of the E. E. Schattschneider Award, a Congressional Fellowship, and the Richard E. Neustadt Award for the Best Reference Book on the Presidency (with Joel Aberbach), all from the APSA. He also received the Pi Sigma Alpha Award from the Midwest Political Science Association; and is an elected member of the National Academy of Social Insurance. He also chairs the National Advisory Committee for the RWJF Changes in Health Care Financing and Organization (HCFO) program, the RWJF Scholars in Health Policy Research Program, and the RWJF Center for Health Policy at the University of New Mexico.  At the University of California, he serves on the system-wide Academic Senate's Health Care Task Force and the Health Benefits Working Group in the UC Office of the President.  

» 1994 Awardee Details

Neil R. Powe, M.D., M.P.H., M.B.A.
  • Constance B. Wofsy Distinguished Professor and Vice-Chair of Medicine
  • University of California, San Francisco

Neil R. Powe is the Constance B. Wofsy Distinguished Professor, Vice-Chair of Medicine at the University of California San Francisco and Chief of Medical Services at San Francisco General Hospital. Dr. Powe's research unites medicine and public health with the goals of saving and improving quality of human lives. It involves the knowledge of fundamental discoveries in biology and clinical medicine to advance the health of patients who ultimately make up a larger population of patients affected by a disease. Dr. Powe studies chronic kidney disease as well as many important diseases with substantial morbidity in areas of prevention and screening, clinical epidemiology, patient outcomes research, technology assessment, and cost-effectiveness analysis. He has extensive experience in developing and measuring outcomes in kidney disease using data from prospective studies, the United States Renal Data System, Medicare records, and patient surveys.

Dr. Powe is principal investigator of a Center for Disease Control and Prevention sponsored study to establish a national surveillance system for chronic kidney disease in the United States. He also leads the Choices for Healthy Outcomes in Caring for ESRD (CHOICE) study, a national study of patient outcomes in the treatment of chronic kidney disease funded by the agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. This was one of the first large prospective studies of incident dialysis patients. In his most recent NIH grant supporting the CHOICE cohort he is examining the role of small organic solutes retained after hemodialysis and their effect on patient outcomes. This project seeks to identify substances that lead to toxicity and poor outcomes in end stage renal disease. Dr. Powe also conducts projects on health disparities, care management, access to care, quality of care and resource allocation.

Jill B. Quadagno, Ph.D.
  • Mildred and Claude Pepper Eminent Scholar
  • Pepper Institute on Aging and Public Policy
  • Florida State University

An internationally recognized expert on aging and public policy, Jill Quadagno is a professor of sociology at Florida State University, where she holds the Mildred and Claude Pepper Eminent Scholar Chair in Social Gerontology. She served as senior policy advisor on the President's Bipartisan Commission on Entitlement and Tax Reform in 1994, and as president of the American Sociological Association (ASA) in 1998.

Much of Quadagno's research has focused on aging policy and Social Security reform, her experiences working on the President's Bipartisan Commission and watching the rise and fall of universal health care in 1994 inspired her to turn her attention to the history of health reform efforts in the U.S. Four years of research laid the foundation for her book, One Nation, Uninsured: Why the U.S. Has No National Health Insurance (Oxford University Press, 2006). Quadagno is the author of 11 other books and more than 50 articles, including The Transformation of Old Age Security: Class and Politics in the American Welfare State and States, and Labor Markets and the Future of Old Age Policy. Her book, The Color of Welfare: How Racism Undermined the War on Poverty (Oxford, 1996), was named Outstanding Book on the Subject of Human Rights in North America by the Gustavos Meyers Center for the Study of Human Rights. She also has served on the editorial boards of the American Sociological Review, Contemporary Sociology, The Gerontologist, and the Journal of Aging Studies.

She has been the recipient of grants from the National Institute on Aging and National Science Foundation, including an NSF Visiting Professorship for Women, which enabled her to teach and do research at Harvard University. In addition, she received the Distinguished Scholar Award from the ASA's Section on Aging, as well as fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the American Council of Learned Societies.

» 1999 Awardee Details

Jeannette Rogowski, Ph.D.
  • University Professor
  • Health Economics
  • School of Public Health
  • Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Jeannette Rogowski is a University Professor in the School of Public Health at Rutgers University. She has over twenty years of experience in studying the economics of the health care system. Dr. Rogowski has published numerous peer-reviewed articles on health insurance, health care use and expenditures by vulnerable populations, and health care financing issues. Her published work has appeared in leading professional journals such as the Journal of the American Medical Association, Pediatrics, the Journal of Health Economics, Health Services Research, and Health Affairs. Dr. Rogowski is internationally recognized for her research on the economics of preterm birth. She has served on numerous national advisory committees including the Institute of Medicine's Committee on Understanding Premature Birth and Assuring Healthy Outcomes and the Steering Committee for the National Institute on Aging's Health and Retirement Study. Dr. Rogowski is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Sara Rosenbaum, J.D.
  • Harold and Jane Hirsh Professor of Health Law and Policy
  • Chair
  • Department of Health Policy
  • School of Public Health and Health Services
  • George Washington University

Sara Rosenbaum is the Harold and Jane Hirsh Professor of Health Law and Policy and chair of the department of health policy at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. Professor Rosenbaum also directs the Hirsh Health Law and Policy Program and the Center for Health Services Research and Policy and holds appointments in the School of Medicine and Health Sciences and the Law School.

As a scholar, an educator and a national leader, Professor Rosenbaum has dedicated her career to promoting more equitable and effective health care policies in this country, particularly in the areas of Medicaid and Medicare, managed care, employee health benefits, maternal and child health, community health centers and civil rights in health care systems. Her commitment to strengthening access to care for low-income, minority and medically underserved populations has had a transforming effect on the lives of many Americans, particularly children.

In addition to her responsibilities as chair of the department of health policy, which she founded and developed, Professor Rosenbaum is director of the Center for Health Policy Research, the institutional home for many of the department's research activities, and Director of the Hirsh Health Law and Policy Program. As a mentor, she is drawn to young people interested in improving health care for the poor.

Professor Rosenbaum has been named one of the nation's 500 most influential health policy makers by McGraw Hill. Among other honors, she has been recognized by the Department of Health and Human Services for distinguished national service on behalf of Medicaid beneficiaries. As a member of the White House Domestic Policy Council under President Clinton, she directed the drafting of the Health Security Act and oversaw the development of the Vaccines for Children program. In 2012 she was elected to the Institute of Medicine.

» 2000 Awardee Details

Mark J. Schlesinger, Ph.D.
  • Professor
  • Director, Undergraduate Studies
  • Department of Epidemiology and Public Health
  • Division of Health Policy and Administration
  • Yale University School of Public Health

Mark J. Schlesinger is a professor in the division of health policy and administration and director of graduate studies at Yale University School of Public Health. He is also a member of the National Advisory Committee of the Investigator Awards in Health Policy Research program, and served for four years as editor of the Journal of Health Policy, Politics and Law. Dr. Schlesinger was previously on the faculty at the Kennedy School of Government and Harvard Medical School, and received his graduate training in economics at the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Schlesinger's research explores the determinants of public opinion about health and social policy, the influence of bounded rationality on medical consumers, the consequences of for-profit organizations in American medicine, as well as the impact of managed care for consumers and health care professionals.

» 1993 Awardee Details

Keith A. Wailoo, Ph.D.
  • Townsend Martin Professor of History and Public Affairs
  • Department of History
  • Vice Dean
  • Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
  • Princeton University

Keith A. Wailoo is the Townsend Martin Professor of History and Public Affairs and is jointly appointed to Princeton University's department of history and Woodrow Wilson International School of Public and International Affairs where he serves as Vice Dean. Previously, he served on the faculty at Rutgers for nine years and was named the Martin Luther King, Jr. Professor of History in 2006. Before joining Rutgers, Dr. Wailoo was a member of the faculty of social medicine and history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

He is author of several award-winning books examining how patterns of disease change over time in America, and focusing especially on the ways in which scientific and technological understandings have interacted with health care politics, racial and ethnic relations, and cultural politics to inform responses to disease in the 20th century and into the 21st century. Among them are: Dying in the City of the Blues: Sickle Cell Anemia and the Politics of Race and Health; Drawing Blood: Technology and Disease Identity in Twentieth Century America; The Troubled Dream of Genetic Medicine: Ethnicity and Innovation in Tay-Sachs, Cystic Fibrosis, and Sickle Cell Disease (co-authored); and A Death Retold: Jesica Santillan, The Bungled Transplant, and Paradoxes of Medical Citizenship (co-edited).

In 1999, Professor Wailoo received the prestigious James S. McDonnell Centennial Fellowship in the History of Science, a $1,000,000 multi-year award to examine the history of cancer, immunology, genetics, and pain in 20th century society. The McDonnell Foundation Fellowship has supported many of his research projects which explore the intersections between understandings of disease in biomedicine, in clinical practice, and in culture. Professor Wailoo’s research has also been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the National Center for Human Genome Research (Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues Program), and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund.

Professor Wailoo was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2007. He received his Ph.D. in 1992 from the University of Pennsylvania. He is a member of the National Advisory Committee of the Investigator Awards in Health Policy Research program.

» 2001 Awardee Details